You Should Know About 2 Diabetes Type – Preventing Full-Blown Diabetes in Women Following Pregnancy

Gestational or pregnancy-related diabetes raises the risk for both mother and baby developing Type 2 diabetes further down the track. In April of 2016, the Mexican Gynecology Journal reported on a study of 671 Gestational diabetes cases. Over a period of 18 years, 10.3 percent of the participants developed full-blown Type 2 diabetes. The following raised the risk…

  • age under 27 or over 35,
  • a Body Mass Index (BMI) of more than 30 (obese),
  • having high blood pressure of pregnancy,
  • insulin therapy,
  • poor blood sugar control, and
  • complications in the pregnancy other than Gestational diabetes.

1. Recommendations for age at childbearing differ. Some sources recommend 20 to 35 as ideal ages when mothers are the most healthy and have the lowest risk of producing a child with severe birth defects. Dr. Sheryl Ross, an obstetrician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, United States, points out the rate of miscarriages is over 50 percent in women over 40. Women giving birth at ages 35 to 39 are at almost two times higher the risk of severe complications than women 20 to 24, and the risk increases more after age 40. Good health is also an important factor at any age.2. A high BMI is a risk factor for both Type 2 and Gestational diabetes. Normalizing the BMI to between 18.5 and 24.9 lowers the risk according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States.

3. The link between high blood pressure of pregnancy and Type 2 diabetes is difficult to explain. High blood pressure, if not properly treated, can lead to preeclampsia and onto eclampsia, or seizures. How could that be related to Type 2 diabetes? Or is it some other factor is involved in both conditions? More research is needed.

4. Needing insulin is an indication diabetes diagnosed during the pregnancy is not well controlled by diet and exercise alone. Maintaining acceptable blood sugar levels by a healthful diet and lifestyle makes insulin unnecessary.

5. Poor blood sugar control could contribute directly to Type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, mothers with poor blood sugar control during the pregnancy could be maintaining a healthy lifestyle and diet after pregnancy. More work is needed to clarify the connection.

6. Could other complications of the pregnancy be caused by Gestational diabetes, or do mothers with other complications tend to have other complications as well? The answer to this question should prove an interesting and useful field of research.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

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You Should Know About 2 Diabetes Type – The Least Common Causes of Diabetes

You are likely familiar with some of the causes of Type 2 diabetes. You may know a little about this form of diabetes or be very aware of the latest regarding new medications, and the strategies for coping with the psychological and social challenges.

Regardless of your background, let us focus on the least common causes of Type 2 diabetes. These do not receive much attention: they are overshadowed by the main culprits, which you are likely acquainted with already.

Let’s get to it…

1. Hormonal Diseases. There is much more affecting the body’s insulin resistance than you may think. It is not all about your lifestyle and well-being; even if they are primary factors. Sometimes diseases may be involved, as is the case with those affecting hormone function.

Some conditions cause a dysfunction in hormone production. In some cases, excess hormones have an effect on insulin, which may play a role in the development of Type 2 diabetes. Acromegaly, hyperthyroidism, and Cushing’s syndrome are some hormonal diseases that can cause Type 2 diabetes.

2. A Damaged Pancreas. The pancreas is a vital organ when it comes to blood sugar management, as it is the site where insulin is produced. For this reason, any damage to the pancreas, or any disease that affects it may predispose an individual to diabetes.

If insulin production or efficiency is impaired, the development of diabetes becomes more likely. Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are two diseases affecting the pancreas that may be considered less than common causes of diabetes.

3. Genetic Mutations. Most of the time, the causes of diabetes can be anticipated and addressed. When it comes to genetic mutations, however, there is little one can do. Sometimes it is a matter of a single gene impairing an individual’s pancreas, limiting its ability to produce insulin. Other times, what happens we may not even currently understand. Remember there is still much we do not know, and science is a field constantly evolving.

Fortunately, anything involving genetics and diabetes is relatively rare and is the exception rather than the rule. Needless to say, genetic mutations are yet another less than common cause.

4. Medications. Lastly and perhaps surprisingly, medications may sometimes be a cause of Type 2 diabetes. Especially those inflicting damage to the beta cells in the pancreas which are responsible for making insulin.

When many people are prescribed drugs, they skip past the “possible side effects” section when reading through the product information. Medications are not perfect and sometimes, they do more harm than good.

Diuretics, psychiatric drugs, and anti-seizure drugs are known for their effects on insulin. Even niacin, a form of vitamin B you can purchase over-the-counter, could make you more vulnerable to diabetes.

Before taking any over-the-counter drugs or supplements, check with your Pharmacist or Doctor before adding them to your list.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

You Should Know About 2 Diabetes Type – Are Dental Implants Suitable for Diabetics With Poorly Controlled Blood Sugar?

One danger of having dental implants is developing an infection which goes on to affect the gums. Infection around the base of the crown which is supported by the implant is often caused due to food being caught around where they join. It usually depends on the shape and location of the teeth. When infection occurs, implants often need to be replaced. Replacement is expensive, painful, and inconvenient. People diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and who have poorly controlled blood sugar levels are at risk for oral infections, but surprisingly enough, not those that complicate dental implants.

Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found implants could remain in place for at least two years infection-free in Type 2 diabetics with high and poorly controlled blood sugar levels.

Their study, published in December of 2016 in the journal Clinical Implant Dental Related Research, included 24 people with Type 2 diabetes patients and who had high blood sugar levels. Each participant received at least two implants…

  • after one year 98.6 percent of implants were still healthy.
  • two years after the implants 96.6 per cent were still infection-free.

There was no link between HbA1c levels and complications. The dentists, therefore, concluded implant therapy is a viable option for Type 2 diabetics with poorly controlled blood sugar levels.Dental implants are artificial tooth roots drilled into the jaw to hold false teeth. They are used when natural teeth are cracked beyond repair or lost due to disease of the bone or gum tissue holding the teeth in place. A titanium post is placed into the jaw, and surrounding bone is given time to grow around the implant. Titanium is a metal that does not rust or cause a reaction from the body. Sometimes a bone donation is used to help hold the post in place. Complete healing around the post can take as long as several months. Then an abutment, or extension of the post, is positioned over it. Finally, an artificial tooth, or crown, is placed onto the abutment. Barring complications dental implants can last for life. False teeth usually last 10 to 15 years. The implant must be checked periodically by x-ray to make sure it is infection-free. Controlling blood sugar levels is important for many reasons, but fortunately according to the study, implants may be placed even with poor control.

Of course, preventing the need for implants is preferable. People with Type 2 diabetes are at risk for gum disease, which can spread to the surrounding tissue holding the tooth in place. Good dental hygiene is essential to prevent any gum disease.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.